Stealth & Safety Zones

One of the tricky things about designing Rogue Process has been trying to capture right mix of action and stealth. Rogue Process is a game about infiltration and thievery, but it can also be a game about showing off, about huge bursts of energy, about blowing the side off a building in order to escape. You go into every new building unseen, undetected, but you often leave with a trail of destruction, bullets and broken technology behind you. There’s many different ways to think about stealth in games – today I want to talk to you about safe zones, and how Rogue Process (and other stealth games) fit into this model.

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GDC & Greenlight

Hey everyone! Let’s get right to the exciting news: Rogue Process was Greenlit last week! At the end of our first week on the site, halfway through our GDC trip, we got the notification from Valve that we’d be accepted onto Steam. Thanks to everyone who voted for us, tweeted about the game, or just gave us some support. It’s a huge relief to have that process over and done with.

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Moon Hunters & Procedural Space

Today I want to talk about Moon Hunters, which is an action RPG by Kitfox Games that came out earlier this year, and recently had a huge free content update. I’ve been meaning to talk about this game for months, and I’m only getting around to it now, but here’s my advice: if you like procedural generation or are interested in thinking about procedural generation, I think you should get this game. It’s beautiful, it sounds great, it’s charming but most importantly I think it has something to say about how procedural generation can be used in a game, and it’s helped inspired some of the generators at work in Rogue Process. Today I’m going to tell you how!

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Procedural Snake Eyes

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I spent a good couple of weekends last month playing alien-busting strategy sequel XCOM 2. I enjoyed a lot of my time with the game, but it also frustrated me a bunch of times as well – in particular, it frustrated me in a lot of ways that Invisible Inc, Klei’s 2015 sneaky masterpiece, didn’t. After completing my XCOM 2 campaign and going back to Invisible Inc for a bit of mulling, I think I’ve come to some conclusions about an important way the two games differ, and how it reveals subtle problems with how procedural generation interacts with other game systems. I want to tell you why I think Invisible Inc structures itself better around procedural content and why I think it’s important (and why my opinion might not matter, too).

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